Welcome Guest (Log In | Register)


Go Back   Anthrocivitas > Other Human sciences > Religion and Philosophy

Reply
The Wonders of Greece : Love 
Thread Tools Display Modes
Old 12-15-2009, 12:10 AM   Post #1
Medousa
Senior Member
 
blank blank blank blank blank blank
Join Date: Oct 2009
Posts: 709
Medousa has much to be proud ofMedousa has much to be proud ofMedousa has much to be proud ofMedousa has much to be proud ofMedousa has much to be proud ofMedousa has much to be proud ofMedousa has much to be proud ofMedousa has much to be proud of
Post The Wonders of Greece : Love

The Wonders of Greece : Love
Agápē, Erōs, Philia, Storgē, Thélēma

What more then to understand the types of love that we posses in our hearts? The Greek language and philosophy very clearly identify the metaphysical emotions that establish our relationships and combine our human nature. This is a thread to gather and reflect the types of love we experience on Earth, and the Greek philosophy behind love.

Quote:
There are several Greek words for love, as the Greek language distinguishes how the word is used. Ancient Greek has four distinct words for love: agape, eros, philia, and storgē. However, as with other languages, it has been historically difficult to separate the meanings of these words. Nonetheless, the senses in which these words were generally used are given below.

Agape (αγάπη agápē) means "love" in modern day Greek, such as in the term s'agapo (Σ'αγαπώ), which means "I love you." In Ancient Greek, it often refers to a general affection rather than the attraction suggested by "eros." Agape is used in ancient texts to denote feelings for a good meal, one's children, and the feelings for a spouse. It can be described as the feeling of being content or holding one in high regard.

Eros (έρως érōs) is passionate love, with sensual desire and longing. The Modern Greek word "erotas" means "(romantic) love;" however, eros does not have to be sexual in nature. Eros can be interpreted as a love for someone whom you love more than the philia, love of friendship. It can also apply to dating relationships as well as marriage. Plato refined his own definition: Although eros is initially felt for a person, with contemplation it becomes an appreciation of the beauty within that person, or even becomes appreciation of beauty itself. It should be noted Plato does not talk of physical attraction as a necessary part of love, hence the use of the word platonic to mean, "without physical attraction." Plato also said eros helps the soul recall knowledge of beauty, and contributes to an understanding of spiritual truth. Lovers and philosophers are all inspired to seek truth by eros. The most famous ancient work on the subject of eros is Plato's Symposium, which is a discussion among the students of Socrates on the nature of eros.

Philia (φιλία philia) means friendship in modern Greek. It is a dispassionate virtuous love, a concept developed by Aristotle. It includes loyalty to friends, family, and community, and requires virtue, equality and familiarity. In ancient texts, philos denoted a general type of love, used for love between family, between friends, a desire or enjoyment of an activity, as well as between lovers.

Storge (στοργή storgē) means "affection" in ancient and modern Greek. It is natural affection, like that felt by parents for offspring. Rarely used in ancient works, and then almost exclusively as a descriptor of relationships within the family. It is also known to express mere acceptance or putting up with situations, as in "loving" the tyrant.

Thelema (θέλημα thélēma) means "desire" in ancient and modern Greek. It is the desire to do something, to be occupied, or to be in prominence.

Wikipedia
M'Agapas, S'Agapo ...

Last edited by Medousa; 12-15-2009 at 12:57 AM.
Medousa is offline   Reply With Quote
The Following 4 Users Say Thank You to Medousa For This Useful Post:
Old 12-15-2009, 01:04 AM   Post #2
Medousa
Senior Member
 
blank blank blank blank blank blank
Join Date: Oct 2009
Posts: 709
Medousa has much to be proud ofMedousa has much to be proud ofMedousa has much to be proud ofMedousa has much to be proud ofMedousa has much to be proud ofMedousa has much to be proud ofMedousa has much to be proud ofMedousa has much to be proud of
Default

Examples of some types of love : These are very deep Greek songs expressing Storge and Eros, they evoke and allude to an anguish a struggle with these kinds of love. A motif seen a lot in Greek folk music about the actual experiences in love.

Χάρις Αλεξίου - Μανούλα μου
"Μανούλα" μου λένε στοργή (?)
+ YouTube Video
ERROR: If you can see this, then YouTube is down or you don't have Flash installed.

Quote:
Μάνα μανούλα μου / Mum My Mummy

Με τη γριά την μάνα μου / With my old mother
να μην τα βάζεις βρε / you don't mess around
κολύμπησε τον Βόσπορο / (she) did swim Bosphorous
και είχε στην πλάτη εμέ / and (she) had me on her back
σαράντα μέρες πέλαγο / 40 days in the open sea
δεν είχε ούτε νερό / (she) didn't have any water
γοργόνα γαλανόλευκη / a marmaid blue-white (like our flag)
την έφερε ως εδώ / brought her till here
μπας και έχει τούρκο το αίμα σου / maybe your blood has a turk inside
και την τυραννάς / and you tortured her
με τα σπασμένα γκέμια σου / with your broken bit reins
παίρνεις και την χτυπάς / you take and beat her up -oh mana manoula mou
ψυχή ψυχούλα μου / soul my little soul
στα βράχια θα τη σπρώξω / onto the rocks will push her
να πάει να γκρεμιστεί / to break her down

Μάνα μανούλα μου/ mum my mummy
ψυχή ψυχούλα μου / soul my little soul!
Δήμος Αναστασιάδης - Μια Προσευχή Για Να ' ρθείς
"Μια Προσευχή..." λένε έρως & στοργή
+ YouTube Video
ERROR: If you can see this, then YouTube is down or you don't have Flash installed.

Quote:
Μια προσευχή για να ‘ρθεις / I Pray For You to Come (first 3 stanzas)

Κι αν με ψάξεις θα χαθείς / If you search me you will get lost
τόσα λόγια ξεχασμένα / so many words of us have been forgotten
εικόνες που έλεγαν θα ‘ρθεις / some pictures (symbols) were saying that you will come
μα πάντα όλα σου ήταν ξένα. / but everything about you was so strange.

Μην μου κλαις, μη φοβηθείς / Don't cry, don't be scared
μένεις στο τίποτα εσύ / you remain still with nothing
σβήσαν τα φώτα της γιορτής / the lights of the party went off
και κάνει θόρυβο η σιωπή. / and silence is being noisy.

Ένα φως πριν αναστηθώ / One light before I arise
κι η ζωή σαν το άνεμο / and when life is like the wind
στους καιρούς να αφήνεσαι / leave must yourself at those times
μια προσευχή για να ‘ρθεις. / I pray for you to come.
Medousa is offline   Reply With Quote
The Following 2 Users Say Thank You to Medousa For This Useful Post:
Old 12-15-2009, 01:30 AM   Post #3
Batayllero
Re-member
 
Batayllero's Avatar
 
OldAragon Catalonia Andorra Occitania EUFlag EarthFlag
Join Date: Oct 2009
Location: Batalonia
Posts: 3,192
Gender:Male
Batayllero has a reputation beyond reputeBatayllero has a reputation beyond reputeBatayllero has a reputation beyond reputeBatayllero has a reputation beyond reputeBatayllero has a reputation beyond reputeBatayllero has a reputation beyond reputeBatayllero has a reputation beyond reputeBatayllero has a reputation beyond reputeBatayllero has a reputation beyond reputeBatayllero has a reputation beyond reputeBatayllero has a reputation beyond repute
Default

I wonder if they have a word too for the love for one's country, or they just use filia.

Here is a song in Greek that represented Cyprus at Eurovision in the 90's. It's also called Mana mou, but it's about the love for their island, comparing it to the goddess Aphrodite. Interesting also the mention of it as Gypsy motherland. Maybe they were Cypriot Gypsies
+ YouTube Video
ERROR: If you can see this, then YouTube is down or you don't have Flash installed.
Lyrics and translation:

Hara:
Pos na se po, hara mou, hara thlimmeni?
How could Icall you, you sad happiness?
Ena nisi ston ilio mas perimenei
An island in sunshine waits for us
Andros:
Porta platia pou anoigeis mes ti psihi mou
A wide door you open in my soul
Both:
Sou tragoudo kai lambeis Anatoli mou
I sing at you and you shine, my East

Both:
Mana mou!
Oh Mother!
Ftoheia patrida, tsingana mou
You poor gypsy motherland
Ta oneira sou seryiana mou
Describe your dreams to me
Mes tis kardias to vytho
In the bottom of the heart

Deihnei mou
It shows me
Tin omorfia sou Afroditi mou
Your beauty, my Aphrodite
To kyma mpainei sto spiti mou
The wave enters my house
Kai skyvo kai proskino
And I bend and worship

Hara:
Eisai flouri tis meras tou iliou mati
You're a daylight jewel, the eye of the sun
Aidoni mes tou ypnou to monopati
A bird in the lane of sleep
Andros:
Vrysi pstazei meli kai paramythia
A watertap which leaks honey and fairytales
Both:
Eisai kaymos pou thelei kai leei alytheia
You've got desire that wants and says the truth

Both:
Mana mou!
Oh Mother!
Ftoheia patrida, tsingana mou
You poor gypsy motherland
Ta oneira sou seryiana mou
Describe your dreams to me
Mes tis kardias to vytho
In the bottom of the heart

Deihnei mou
It shows me
Tin omorfia sou Afroditi mou
Your beauty, my Aphrodite
To kyma mpainei sto spiti mou
The wave enters my house
Kai skyvo kai proskino
And I bend and worship

Hara:
dam dabadam dabadabadabada!
Andros:
dabadadabadadabadadabadabadaba!

Hara:
dam dabadam dabadabadabada!
Andros:
dabadadabadadabadadabadabadaba!

Hara:
dam dabadam dabadabadabada!
Andros:
dabadadabadadabadadabadabadaba!

Both:
dabadabada dabadabada dabadabadadabadabadabada!

Mana mou!
Oh Mother!
Ftoheia patrida, tsingana mou
You poor gypsy motherland
Ta oneira sou sergiana mou
Describe your dreams to me
Kai skyvo kai proskino
And I bend and worship
Batayllero is offline   Reply With Quote
The Following 2 Users Say Thank You to Batayllero For This Useful Post:
Reply

Thread Tools
Display Modes

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off

Forum Jump


All times are GMT. The time now is 04:27 AM.


Powered by vBulletin® Version 3.8.4
Copyright ©2000 - 2014, Jelsoft Enterprises Ltd.