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Peopling of three Mediterranean islands (Corsica, Sardinia, and Sicily) 
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Old 11-20-2009, 04:33 AM   Post #1
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Default Peopling of three Mediterranean islands (Corsica, Sardinia, and Sicily)

Peopling of three Mediterranean islands (Corsica, Sardinia, and Sicily) inferred by Y-chromosome biallelic variability
Francalacci et al.
2003


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An informative set of biallelic polymorphisms was used to study the structure of Y-chromosome variability in a sample from the Mediterranean islands of Corsica and Sicily, and compared with data on Sardinia to gain insights into the ethnogenesis of these island populations. The results were interpreted in a broader Mediterranean context by including in the analysis neighboring populations previously studied with the same methodology. All samples studied were enclosed in the comparable spectrum of European Y-chromosome variability. Pronounced differences were observed between the islands as well as in the percentages of haplotypes previously shown to have distinctive patterns of continental phylogeography. Approximately 60% of the Sicilian haplotypes are also prevalent in Southern Italy and Greece. Conversely, the Corsican sample had elevated levels of alternative haplotypes common in Northern Italy. Sardinia showed a haplotype ratio similar to that observed in Corsica, but with a remarkable difference in the presence of a lineage defined by marker M26, which approaches 35% in Sardinia but seems absent in Corsica. Although geographically adjacent, the data suggest different colonization histories and a minimal amount of recent gene flow between them. Our results identify possible ancestral continental sources of the various island populations and underscore the influence of founder effect and genetic drift. The Y-chromosome data are consistent with comparable mtDNA data at the RFLP haplogroup level of resolution, as well as linguistic and historic knowledge.
http://www.citeulike.org/user/Archae...rticle/1823158
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Old 11-20-2009, 11:43 AM   Post #2
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Corsica should not be studied as one entity. I'm amazed by the lack of historical knowledge of geneticists : that would save them much time.
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Old 11-20-2009, 11:52 AM   Post #3
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What should it be studied with?? Tuscany, Genoa?
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Old 11-20-2009, 12:47 PM   Post #4
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What should it be studied with?? Tuscany, Genoa?
No, no, I meant that at least, a distinction should be made between the Tuscan-speaking North and the Gallurese-speaing South. It's amazing that geneticists do not correlate genetic affinities with linguistic ones, however imperfect the relation is.

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Old 11-20-2009, 08:49 PM   Post #5
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Sassarese is lexically sardinian and that makes it a halfway between sardinian and gallurese.
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Old 11-20-2009, 10:33 PM   Post #6
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Sardinians are rather unique or genetic outliers, aren't they? Or (not to Heuras), have I paid too much attention to geneticists at the expense of historians?
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Old 11-21-2009, 11:12 AM   Post #7
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Sardinians are rather unique or genetic outliers, aren't they? Or (not to Heuras), have I paid too much attention to geneticists at the expense of historians?
Indeed, though it can hardly be seen linguistically, because the island is fully Romanized.

I wonder what language the Nuragic megalithic culture spoke, before the coming of Etruscans and Phoenicians.
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Old 11-27-2009, 01:08 AM   Post #8
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Indeed, though it can hardly be seen linguistically, because the island is fully Romanized.

I wonder what language the Nuragic megalithic culture spoke, before the coming of Etruscans and Phoenicians.
The Nuragic language would have been of (Lydian) Anatolian origin, related to Etruscan. The language(s) spoken before that could have been related to proto-Iberian, and even to some north African languages.

Plenty of interesting stuff to read following this link, but it's only in Italian.

http://www.pittau.it/Sardo/studi.html
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Old 11-27-2009, 02:29 AM   Post #9
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Great site, Satyr. I don't know why but I like Sardinia in a way that doesn't happen to me with Corsica or Sicily.
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Old 11-27-2009, 02:45 AM   Post #10
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I don't know why but I like Sardinia in a way that doesn't happen to me with Corsica or Sicily.
The people, perhaps?

Seriously, I think the same. Corsica is breathtaking, but perhaps too much. It's too mountainious (it's the moutainious island par excellence), too many forests too. I find it oppressing. I still have to visit Sicily.

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