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Negritos (southeast asia) 
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Old 01-27-2010, 01:37 AM   Post #1
oditous
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Default Negritos (southeast asia)

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The term Negrito refers to several ethnic groups in isolated parts of Southeast Asia.

Their current populations include the Aeta, Agta, Ayta, Pygmies, Ita, Baluga, Ati, Dumagat and at least 25 other tribes of the Philippines, the Semang of the Malay peninsula, the Mani of Thailand and 12 Andamanese tribes of the Andaman Islands of the Indian Ocean.

Negritos share some common physical features with African pygmy populations, including short stature, natural afro-hair texture, and dark skin; however, their origin and the route of their migration to Asia is still a matter of great speculation. They are the most genetically distant human population from Africans at most loci studied thus far (except for MCR1, which codes for dark skin).

They have also been shown to have separated early from Asians, suggesting that they are either surviving descendants of settlers from an early migration out of Africa, or that they are descendants of one of the founder populations of modern humans.
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Negrito




Quote:
The numbers in the map above refer to the following possibly Vedda- and Negrito-related groups. The list is by no means complete. It may contain groups that, if more were known about their genetic and other affinities, would be revealed not to belong here. Expecially in Indonesia there are many smaller and not-so-small islands with populations in their mountainous interiors that remain practically unknown.
That map is from this excellent site: http://www.andaman.org/
Link to their ebook:
http://www.andaman.org/BOOK/text-group-BodyChapters.htm



Philippines

Ati (panay island)






Aeta (luzon island)












Mamanwa (mindanao island)









Thailand

Mani









Malaysia

Bateq












Jahai












Kensiu





Indonesia

Kubu / Orang Rimba (sumatra), usually considered to be proto malays, but IMHO some individuals show negrito/veddoid influence.











Andaman Islands


Jarawa













Great Andamanese








Onge






Sentinelese








Last edited by oditous; 01-27-2010 at 01:50 AM.
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Old 01-27-2010, 06:06 AM   Post #2
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A great collection of photos here.

The Orang Rimba of Sumatra seem vaguely Papuan. The majority of the negritos look mixed with neo-mongolids in varying degrees, with the exception of the remarkably isolated and "well preserved" Andaman Islanders.
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Old 01-28-2010, 01:44 AM   Post #3
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Originally Posted by riser View Post
The Orang Rimba of Sumatra seem vaguely Papuan. The majority of the negritos look mixed with neo-mongolids in varying degrees, with the exception of the remarkably isolated and "well preserved" Andaman Islanders.
Yeah i agree, about the orang rimba i have to say i did select the most non-malay looking persons. i don't think their phenotype is dominant but it does pop up.

Here's some kids from the Jahai people in Malaysia. Jahay are located right at the border with thailand. Also wideranging degrees of admixture it seems.

This was situation ca 1920, populations have shrunk since then























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Old 02-05-2010, 07:56 PM   Post #4
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Andamanese tribes, languages die

Two unique languages disappear with death of last speakers

When Boro died on Strait Island last November, Boa lost a friend. The world lost a language.

Last week, Boa also died. Another language died with her.

The death of these last surviving speakers of two Great Andamanese languages, Khora and Bo, has resulted in the extermination of their unique tribes on the islands.

“There are just 50 Great Andamanese left,” says Anvita Abbi, a professor at Jawaharlal Nehru University who has undertaken a project to document the languages of these tribes. “Now we only have Jeru and Sare speakers in the group.”

Originally, the Great Andamanese were a group of ten tribes with a total population of 5,000 when the British colonised the Andaman Islands. Over the years, most were killed or died of the diseases brought by settlers.

When the tsunami hit the islands in 2004, 80-year-old Boa was still strong enough to climb a tree. But she was shaken by the death of her friend Boro, a frail introvert with curling white hair, last year.

“When Boro died, Boa told me she felt very lonely,” says Dr. Abbi. “Already, Boa used to lament that no one else shared her mother’s language. She would sing her songs in Bo, but no one else could understand her…No one else could help her translate them for me,” she added.

Dr. Abbi was unable to get a full grasp of the Bo and Khora languages with the inputs of just one speaker. However, she and her team have compiled a dictionary of 2,500 words in Great Andamanese, a mixture of all four languages — Bo, Khora, Sare and Jeru. The tri-lingual, tri-scriptal book could help not just linguists but ecologists as well, as many of the words are the names of plants, birds and fishes.

“For example, one of the words is ain. Boa told me of these small bushes, which grow by the seashore…She said that when ain leaves are crushed and put in water, it intoxicates the fish which float up, making them easier to catch,” says Dr. Abbi.

Subsequent experiments on the west coast of the Andamans showed that Boa’s recollections were correct, although the bushes were later destroyed by the tsunami.

“It’s a storehouse of indigenous languages for environmentalists,” Dr. Abbi adds.

Survival International director Stephen Curry says that the death of Boa and the extinction of the Bo language should spur action to save the remaining tribes.

“A unique part of human society is now just a memory. Boa’s loss is a bleak reminder that we must not allow this to happen to the other tribes of the Andaman Islands,” he says.

If outsiders helped wipe out the Great Andamanese, they are also helping to record their voices. Dr. Abbi’s dictionary project includes an audio CD. “If you click on a word or phrase, you can hear Boa’s voice saying it…You can hear her songs.”

There are songs of celebration and of mourning, of the rain and the sea, of hunting and dancing — all in a language now dead. Is anyone listening.
http://beta.thehindu.com/news/nation...icle100977.ece
Really sad, this is an overview of andamanese languages




Picture of Boro



Pictures of Boa and other great andamanese










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Old 02-05-2010, 07:59 PM   Post #5
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They seem to have some Asiaitic features. Did they mix with East Asian Mongoloids, or they are the proto-East Asians. Because I heard the Australoids whom the Negeritios belong to are proto-Mongoloids.
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Old 02-06-2010, 12:28 PM   Post #6
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They might be, according to this paper eastasians are a subset of SE asians. Although most negritos nowadays are admixed with modern mongoloids.

Quote:
Mapping Human Genetic Diversity in Asia
The HUGO Pan-Asian SNP Consortium*,

Asia harbors substantial cultural and linguistic diversity, but the geographic structure of genetic variation across the continent remains enigmatic. Here we report a large-scale survey of autosomal variation from a broad geographic sample of Asian human populations. Our results show that genetic ancestry is strongly correlated with linguistic affiliations as well as geography. Most populations show relatedness within ethnic/linguistic groups, despite prevalent gene flow among populations. More than 90% of East Asian (EA) haplotypes could be found in either Southeast Asian (SEA) or Central-South Asian (CSA) populations and show clinal structure with haplotype diversity decreasing from south to north. Furthermore, 50% of EA haplotypes were found in SEA only and 5% were found in CSA only, indicating that SEA was a major geographic source of EA populations.


More pictures from malaysian negritos, all from bateq tribe




















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Old 02-07-2010, 12:59 AM   Post #7
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More malaysian negritos, the Jahai




















































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Old 02-08-2010, 03:15 PM   Post #8
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Originally Posted by Nephilim View Post
They seem to have some Asiaitic features. Did they mix with East Asian Mongoloids, or they are the proto-East Asians. Because I heard the Australoids whom the Negeritios belong to are proto-Mongoloids.
some gene flow. No relationship.
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Old 02-09-2010, 04:28 AM   Post #9
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Quote:
Originally Posted by David Noi View Post
some gene flow. No relationship.
Well I haven't seen a rebuttal to this paper yet, which proves you wrong.

http://www.sciencemag.org/cgi/conten...;326/5959/1541
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Old 02-15-2010, 11:56 PM   Post #10
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Originally Posted by oditous View Post
Andaman Islands


Jarawa













Great Andamanese








Onge






Sentinelese







Just to add, Andaman is in India. I don't understand why its geographically within S.E.A tho.

By the way sorry but is that his penis?!


Last edited by Kumar; 02-16-2010 at 12:05 AM.
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